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Real-Time Web Curation Site "Storify" Adds Search with Solr

03.31.2012
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Storify is "a company building tools to help journalists, bloggers and experts curate the real-time Web."  As you can imagine, search functionality for this kind of tool can be a crucial feature, and this week, the service finally added search by using an open source technology you may have heard of: Apache Solr.

Vincent Battaglia, a developer at Storify is the one who let us in on this little secret that wasn't clear in the announcement on Storify's blog.



Users can now search for a place, news event, subject, or they can search by a user, or stories that mention themselves.

I think the fact that Twitter uses Lucene may still be tipping the balance in favor of Solr/Lucene when some of these web companies choose Solr over ElasticSearch.  There's certainly a very vocal group in favor of ElasticSearch that are trying to increase the number of converts from the established Solr/Lucene camp.

Comments

Uri Boness replied on Sat, 2012/03/31 - 3:38pm

 I think the fact that Twitter uses Lucene may still be tipping the balance in favor of Solr/Lucene when some of these web companies choose Solr over ElasticSearch.  There's certainly a very vocal group in favor of ElasticSearch that are trying to increase the number of converts from the established Solr/Lucene camp.

Sorry, but this conclusion or statement just doesn't make sense and is quite misleading. I don't know if it's a common misconception that choosing for Lucene by default means choosing for Solr, but if it is, it's certainly unfortunate. ElasticSearch supports Lucene and is based on it just like Solr is. In fact, many of the core Lucene committers often choose ES over Solr as their preferred distributed search engine. The fact that Twitter is using Lucene doesn't say a thing about the reasoning behind choosing ElasticSearch or Solr. So anyone out there facing the "challenge" of deciding between the two, please... base your decisions on solid and valid arguments which should probably relate to the distribution nature, the scalability, the realtime-ness and the performance aspects of these two solutions.

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