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Daily Dose - Google Go Joining GNU Compiler Collection

01.29.2010
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Google Go Joining GNU Compiler Collection   
The GNU Compiler Collection Steering committee says it will support Google Go in GCC 4.5 or later.  Google's Ian Taylor will be the maintainer and GCC release managers will handle the integration of new code into the compiler collection.  Ian Taylor recently announced that the Go license would now include an explicit patent grant.

Chrome Takes a Page From IE8's Book
Google recently announced five new security features for the Chrome browser.  Of the five features, two of them were security additions that Internet Explorer 8 implemented starting in March of 2009.  Although some consider IE to be behind its competition, this recent news shows that in some respects, IE is ahead of the game.  The two IE features that Chrome added include a cross-site scripting filter and an anti-clickjacking feature.  One of the IE security researchers said a few years ago that the anti-clickjacking feature would have "zero impact", but it seems that he was wrong.

Amazon is Rolling in it
For Q4 2009, Amazon's net income rose 71% compared to a year ago.  The numbers beat many estimates with net sales increasing 42% since 2008.  Amazon also experienced 37% growth, but that's down from a year ago.  The company says the Kindle e-reader really helped out this year along with media sales.  However, there's a chance their cloud offerings could suffer in Q1 of this year with the recent reports of latency issues.

Adobe's Mad at the iPad
You shouldn't be surprised to hear that the new iPad, like the iPhone, doesn't support Flash.  Despite the fact that we all expected it, Adobe manager Adrian Ludwing still took the opportunity to reprimand Apple for not supporting Flash on its newest device.  Although it's true that the iPhone and iPad can't access a lot of the games and video on the web, new standardized ways of viewing video like YouTube and Vimeo's HTML5 players are providing alternatives to Flash.  Apple's iPhone may be one of the key motivations behind this movement.

Oracle/Sun Strategy: We will invest heavily in JavaFX (What, me worry?)
Jim Weaver gives thorough overview of Oracle's plans for JavaFX.  Weaver also gives his view on what challenges JavaFX needs to overcome under Oracle.
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