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What JavaFX Examples Do Developers Want to See?

03.10.2009
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Joshua Marinacci asked what JavaFX samples people wanted to see in his latest blog entry, and the results are now in.

If you've downloaded the SDK already what would you like to build but don't know how to? If you haven't downloaded the SDK what sample would inspire you to try it out? If you've already started building an app, what problems you encountered? What could you use help with? Deployment? Media? Animation? Browser integration?

WishCount
Interaction with server by REST, JSON, FTP and so on10
Interaction between DOM and an JavaFX applet2
Video playback/edit7
Deployment/Installation5
Database front-end10
Game1
Nice components, easy to using13
Webcam1
Swing integration21
Animation1

The interesting thing to note here is that people want to use it for standard, office and enterprise, applications, rather than using it for fun stuff.

 

Published at DZone with permission of its author, Sergey Surikov.

(Note: Opinions expressed in this article and its replies are the opinions of their respective authors and not those of DZone, Inc.)

Comments

Richard Osbaldeston replied on Tue, 2009/03/10 - 6:19am

 

The interesting thing to note here is that people want to use it for standard, office and enterprise, applications, rather than using it for fun stuff. 

 That's a shame because JavaFX is really targetting the fun stuff rather than the traditional desktop enterprise apps. Not that you can't do enterprisy things with just textboxes, buttons - just look at what html has done so far, but in terms of datagrids etc.. Sure Josh would say use Swing & JPA.

 What does 'Swing Intergration' mean? Swing in JavaFX rather pointless and boring, I mean what does JavaFX add to the components UX? (nothing - in fact it limits your jfx app to just desktop profiles) or using JavaFX from Swing/Java? - of far more interest to Swing developers, but mixing glossy rich jfx components with say Windows PLAF ones questionable..? Having a stable Scenegraph API for Java would be nice, possibly access to Decora (which I think is the only visual thing we can't do from Swing/Java2D) media access we already have - although the documentation is weak.

 Also surprised games came in so low - Looking at the huge sucess of the iPhone appstore I'd say mobile gaming ought to be one of the major targets for JavaFX - in fact mobile period is where JavaFX can offer the most benefits (over Swing/SWT/trad. Applets) and games are the bigest overall seller. 

 What so you take away from this poll? that developers dont want fun, noddy little RIA 'demos' they want serious, functional components and the ease automatic binding, validation might bring to they're coding instead?

Fran Aviles replied on Tue, 2009/03/10 - 6:18am

I believe that poll is not very credible. If it is, I don´t understand Java people demanding something so flashy like Flash.

Sergey Surikov replied on Tue, 2009/03/10 - 6:24am

 That's a shame because JavaFX is really targetting the fun stuff rather than the traditional desktop enterprise apps.
 --
 Aim of development Java was coffee grinders programming in early 90
 
 
What does 'Swing Intergration' mean? Swing in JavaFX rather pointless and boring
--
Look to this example
http://jfxstudio.wordpress.com/2009/02/18/something-usefull/
this is Swing LAF integrated in JavaFX application


I mean what does JavaFX add to the components UX? (nothing - in fact it limits your jfx app to just desktop profiles)
--
Look to this JavaFX example
http://jfxstudio.wordpress.com/2009/03/03/the-graphic-database-front-end/
Is it nice?

 
Also surprised games came in so low - Looking at the huge sucess of the iPhone appstore
--
How much did you pay for fun'n'games? How much your boss pay to you for boring enterprise development?
Linus Torvalds worked just for fun many ears ago.

Richard Osbaldeston replied on Tue, 2009/03/10 - 6:52am in response to: Fran Aviles

Not sure of you're meaning here, but the poll suggests people are asking for something NOT like Flash, but more like Swing. Animation, DOM access and Games scored the worst and video playback middling. Although a couple of dozen votes at most probally isn't any kind of representation at all. So another thing that this poll might tell us is nobodies really that intersted in client side Java?

James Sugrue replied on Tue, 2009/03/10 - 6:52am in response to: Sergey Surikov

Good points Sergey. Initially when people think about JavaFX, or even look at the examples, we seem to think of the "fun, flashy" stuff. But for JavaFX to succeed it has to go futher. And just because it is used for the front end of a "standard" application, doesn't mean it has to be boring. I think that database frontend is pretty cool. More examples like that will show how JavaFX can fit nicely into the UI layer. James

Coffee Jolts replied on Tue, 2009/03/10 - 8:41am

I think you guys are missing the boat here. What Java people want from JavaFX is the best of both worlds. They want to be able to use JavaFX to build typical business applications as well as flashy stuff. If JavaFX is only good for one or the other, then it's really no good at all.

James Sugrue replied on Tue, 2009/03/10 - 9:53am in response to: Coffee Jolts

I'm not sure that it's a choice of one or the other - I think it's capable of both. This article just deals with what the developers want to see from JavaFX.

Jonathan Curran replied on Tue, 2009/03/10 - 9:55am

Hmm, at the very least, put together something similar to the Adobe Flex Component Explorer which can be found at http://examples.adobe.com/flex3/componentexplorer/explorer.html

That would be a good start.

Then perhaps port one of the Pet Shop Examples and add all the whiz-bang-animations to it.

Richard Osbaldeston replied on Tue, 2009/03/10 - 10:38am in response to: James Sugrue

The db app looks nice, but I can't help but wonder what embedding a JTable in JavaFX achives. How does this makeover make life any easier or pleasant for the user of the application? Did the client expressly ask that the UIs appearance should take prescience it's performance. In many ways the overlying of semi-transparency underneath list text makes it much harder to read and the user has to explore each widgets to discover their function (cant tell from looking). In UI design terms the usability has suffered and I'd hazard users would prefer a simple native-OS looking form.

Of course it isn't clear what this  example was trying to achive, just an attractive demo? or is it part of a kiosk interface? Dosent appear to function like a web page or standalone desktop app (ref locale toggle). Without the source it's hard to tell if the db access is all handled asynchronously off the EDT. Looking at the jar theres nearly 300 classes in that app? Think it'd be far easier to follow the Netbeans tutorial on JPA and knock up the same thing in far fewer lines of code, and a fraction of the time. Fundamentally with that interface theres nothing rich there, it's all easily duplicable in Swing. Given that the db app won't work in the JavaFX common profile - why use JavaFX at all? Use the right tools for the job ref http://twitter.com/joshmarinacci/status/1277257077.

Jose Jeria replied on Tue, 2009/03/10 - 10:37am in response to: Jonathan Curran

Maybe offtopic, but it is interesting to see that the ext-GWT widgets are more complex, better looking and faster to load than Adobe Flex 3 components:

http://www.extjs.com/explorer/

Sergey Surikov replied on Tue, 2009/03/10 - 10:40am

In UI design terms the usability has suffered and I'd hazard users would prefer a simple native-OS looking form.

--

I know. Most of users prefer command-line applications (joke)

 

Looking at the jar theres nearly 300 classes in that app?

--

No. Classes like DerbyUIImages$23$3.class autogenerated by JavaFX compiler

Dean Del Ponte replied on Tue, 2009/03/10 - 12:03pm

How about an app I can run in the browser without having to first click yes on a security dialog?

Sergey Surikov replied on Tue, 2009/03/10 - 1:52pm in response to: Dean Del Ponte

Ask Sun about it

Jose Jeria replied on Tue, 2009/03/10 - 3:43pm

JavaFX is Sun biggest mistake ever. Java developers are simply not interested in it and the target group, designers (?), would never touch it.

It  can also never compete with Flash, since it freezes your browser, shows scary dialogs and takes ages to load.

Aries McRae replied on Tue, 2009/03/10 - 8:36pm

Like the majority of enterprise developers, I don't know nor care about Swing. Also, it's a pain fiddling around with CSS, JavaScript and JSTL. Flashy bouncing balls don't impress me. What I want to see is useful business UI components that are as rich as those of found in ex-GWT with real business benefits like DisplayTag in steroids that represent backend data. Let's wait and see what JavaFX 2.0 could offer.

Max Katz replied on Fri, 2009/03/13 - 12:02pm in response to: Coffee Jolts

I will second that. For JavaFX to succeed it has to be used for "fun" stuff , but even more importantly for enterprise applications. Adobe has done a great job pushing Flex into the Enterprise. So far majority of JavaFX examples show how shapes move around - not very useful for the enterprise. 

Max
http://mkblog.exadel.com

john green green replied on Fri, 2009/10/23 - 2:05am

Of course it isn't clear what this example was trying to achive, just an attractive demo? or is it part of a kiosk interface? Dosent appear to function like a web page or standalone desktop app (ref locale toggle). Without the source it's hard to tell if the db access is all handled asynchronously off the EDT. Looking at the jar theres nearly 300 classes in that app?

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