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Recession Proof Java Programmers

12.03.2008
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For the purpose of being recession proof, Java programmers should diversify what they spend their time learning. Specifically, Java programmers should add business topics to their learning diet.

My Learning Diet Backstory

Before starting my Crosby MBA Program two and half years ago, I was an avid Java programmer with an intense appetite for technology knowledge. I spent a lot of time reading Java newsletters and articles from sites such as the Java.net (even wrote a couple articles), TheServerSide.com, and JavaWorld.com. In addition, I earned four Sun Java Certifications and attended the JavaOne technology conference from 2004 to 2006. I focused on learning about new frameworks (e.g., Apache projects), APIs, and methodologies (e.g., Agile, XP). I was so engrossed in the learning things to help me be a better programmer that I could not have told you whether the company I worked for was going to achieve long-term profitability or how much my programmer team contributed to its profits. On the other hand, recession proof programmers have a pulse on both technology and business.

Recession Proof Learning for Java Programmers

Recession proof learning includes a mix of technology and business such that an understanding of industry trends and profitability can be gained. If you are a technology-only learner like I was before, then I recommend easing yourself into business with the subsequent action items.
  1. Start with TechCrunch - Subscribing to TechCrunch's e-mail should be an easy thing for any Java programmer to do since it is solely concerned with business news within technology industries. Particularly, TechCrunch generates a steady stream of comprehensive news and reviews from a broad range of tech industries. I recommend skimming TechCrunch's daily e-mail to read only what is of interest. As time passes, you can begin to build a sense of which tech industries are hot, cold, and saturated (i.e., highly competitive).
  2. Listen to WSJ Podcasts - The Wall Street Journal What's News and Tech News Briefing are three to six minute podcasts that can expose you to industry news and trends that you would not be exposed to otherwise. For example, you can learn which companies and industries are failing due to the recession and, thus, plan a job change to a different industry before your company fails.
  3. Review the most profitable industries - I advocate reading Fortune 500's most profitable industries on an annual basis. The 2008 list of most profitable industries (from end of year 2007 data) was lead by Network and Other Communications Equipment, Mining/ Crude-Oil Production, and Pharmaceuticals. Working in an industry that is among the most profitable is an excellent strategy for increasing job security. Important questions to ask yourself are: what industry is my company competing in? Is the industry trending towards an increase or decrease in profitability? Is the industry growing such that there is room for new companies to make a profit without incurring tough competition from established companies?
Benefits of Business Learning

Benefits I have experienced from following business news and trends include the following.
  1. Business news stimulates ideas - A great way to get your creative and entrepreneurial juices flowing is to hear about what other entrepreneurs are doing, why some are successful, and why others fail.
  2. Visualize your career path - Having a pulse on your industry and other industries can help you plan career moves. In the short-term, it can give you a better understanding what is affecting the profitability of your current employer.
  3. Identify new opportunities - Subscribing to industry news and trends can put you in position to pounce on new opportunities. For example, in summer 2007, Facebook released the Facebook Platform allowing developers to build applications inside Facebook. Programmers that acted quickly experienced success while slow movers got lost in the shuffle. The same thing is now happening with mobile platforms. For example, developers can earn money developing applications for the iPhone that are sold at Apple's iPhone App Store or for Google's Android platform in the Android Marketplace. Success in these evolving markets requires continual monitoring so you can understand their market size and potential.
In sum, diversifying your knowledge can reduce your risk of unemployment and, thus, improve your chances of being a recession proof Java programmer.

How do you get your technology and business news? Which topics do you follow?

From http://www.pardontheinformation.com/2008/11/recession-proof-java-programmers.html

Published at DZone with permission of its author, Robert Miller.

(Note: Opinions expressed in this article and its replies are the opinions of their respective authors and not those of DZone, Inc.)

Comments

Jeroen Wenting replied on Thu, 2008/12/04 - 2:25am

Far more important is not being a one-trick horse, so not being a 'Java programmer' but being a programmer or better yet a software engineer who can do more than just hack code together as long as it fits within some narrow margin of what that 'Java programmer' has done before.

Learn C++, learn Cobol, learn PL/SQL, learn design skills, learn to communicate with customers.
In other words, become an asset that can be used in more than one way, that doesn't need constant supervision and handholding but can work independently.

 

Serge Bureau replied on Thu, 2008/12/04 - 10:01am in response to: Jeroen Wenting

[quote=jwenting]

Far more important is not being a one-trick horse, so not being a 'Java programmer' but being a programmer or better yet a software engineer who can do more than just hack code together as long as it fits within some narrow margin of what that 'Java programmer' has done before.

Learn C++, learn Cobol, learn PL/SQL, learn design skills, learn to communicate with customers.
In other words, become an asset that can be used in more than one way, that doesn't need constant supervision and handholding but can work independently.

 

[/quote]

I am sorry but I would prefer selling hamburgers than doing Cobol or C++.

Design skills is of course always good.

I consider myself as a "solution provider", and Java is my tool.

Jim Bethancourt replied on Thu, 2008/12/04 - 10:57am

Great post!  I would also strongly recommend networking both online and in real life:

Get an account on LinkedIn and add everyone you know to your network.  You never know who is waiting to contact you.

Go to local JUG meetings, giving you opportunities to make new friends and meet recruiters and potential employers.  On top of that, you'll learn something new and get some free pizza out of the deal too. Don't be bashful either -- get out there and make some new friends!  Quite a number of JUGs also have job mailing lists.  Subscribe to your local JUG job list and look at the recent history of the list and respond to those ads and get in touch with recruiters / employers who sent older posts. 

If you're currently out of a job, try your best to make at least 10 calls a day to potential employers / recruiters.

Get involved in an open source project -- it's a great way to get a referral when you're asked for them, and could potentially lead to a job.  I've had at least one good referral this way and another led to a job offer at one point to work on a different project.

 

Cheers,

Jim

Houston JUG President

http://www.hjug.org

Jeroen Wenting replied on Mon, 2008/12/08 - 3:26am in response to: Serge Bureau

[quote=SergeBureau][quote=jwenting]

Far more important is not being a one-trick horse, so not being a 'Java programmer' but being a programmer or better yet a software engineer who can do more than just hack code together as long as it fits within some narrow margin of what that 'Java programmer' has done before.

Learn C++, learn Cobol, learn PL/SQL, learn design skills, learn to communicate with customers.
In other words, become an asset that can be used in more than one way, that doesn't need constant supervision and handholding but can work independently.

 

[/quote]

I am sorry but I would prefer selling hamburgers than doing Cobol or C++.[/quote]

C++ isn't too bad. Cobol gets boring quickly, but no more quickly than selling burgers while being bossed around by someone 20+ years your junior and pays rather better too.

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