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Sean Hull is a renowned author, speaker and advisor on MySQL & Oracle databases, web performance and scalability, EC2, Linux & Internet Architecture. He is the author of "Oracle & Open Source" O'Reilly, 2001, and speaks widely at conferences and forums. With 20 years of professional experience, he consults with large enterprises and startups in New York City and the San Francisco Bay Area. Sean is a DZone MVB and is not an employee of DZone and has posted 64 posts at DZone. You can read more from them at their website. View Full User Profile

Lulzsec, Anonymous and the sorry state of internet security

11.22.2013
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If you’ve been hiding under a rock for the past few years, you might not have heard of Anonymous, the headline grabbing hacker group that’s famous for attacking Citibank, eBay, Sony, the FBI, CIA and the websites of various world governments.

Parmy Olson takes us on a ride, through tales that are riveting, and quite a bit scary for what they reveal about today’s internet, and the false sense of security we all have.

Kids these days!

By now you’ve probably heard their names: T-flow, Topiary, Sabu, & Kayla. And then there was AVunit, pwnsauce, Sup_g, and Havij. Cool characters, sitting at keyboards all over the world hatching menacing attacks, and seeming more organized than they actually were…

Topiary jumped into the role as spokesman for the group. Listening to this live hack only seems amusing in retrospect, now that the group has been brought down…

For all the subcultures you’ve never heard of…

Today’s internet is rife with fascinating subcultures, many I’d never heard of. Parmy’s book on Anonymous takes us to the door of all these places, and gives us a candid peak at what goes on there. Kids these days are up to no good!

The bizarro Encyclopedia Dramatica is a wikipedia of weirdness. And then there’s Googledorks, a hackers delight of exploits (ways to break into systems online), and hacks.

And let’s not forget 4Chan the online community and forum that hatched Anonymous.

You thought Ascii Art was cool, but have you heard of zalgo text? That’s the text garbling software that created this posts image.

If you’re looking to dig a little deeper, browse over to know your meme, a sort of urban dictionary for internet subcultures.

Don’t forget the 47 rules of the internet. I’m still looking for rules two through thirty three. Does this have something to do with this 33?

With only a very thin blanket to secure us…

If you’re not already a touch paranoid with the risks of online banking, social networks and identity theft you will be after reading this tale.

Anonymous troublemakers were able to send SWAT teams to unsuspecting people’s homes, crowd source personal information, social engineer their way to facts about someone and then dox them publishing all that personal information online.

On the more technical side, many sites are vulnerable to SQL Injection a rather technical sounding method to trick websites into dumping the contents of their databases back to a hacker. There’s even an automated tool called sqlmap to help you with the dirty work.

And then there are the very illegal denial of service attack tools like the ominous sounding low orbit ion cannon. Please don’t try this at home!

Definitely the worst of all offenders are the botnets, swarms of infected computers that can be controlled from a central location, to wreak havoc on users and internet firms alike. Thanks Bill!

As a parting word, take a quick look at this instructional video on using backtrack5, a hacking & security testing tool…

The older roots of hacking circa 80’s and 90’s

I remember back in the 80’s when War Games came out. It was a scary premise. With the cold war between the US and the former Soviet Union in full bloom, it felt very real.

The 90’s brought Clifford Stoll hunting a hacker through his computer systems in The Cuckoo’s Egg.

And then along comes Kevin Mitnick, turning his finger up at US agents, and wreaking his own havoc in his wake.

The anonymous story turns more political when they meet the likes of Julian Assange, but even that isn’t new. Remember the Pentagon Papers?

What’s really knew is how the internet has grown, but how computers have not gotten more secure through that period. It has all grown more brittle, with many websites, and personal computers steered by unsuspecting users.

Surprisingly soft landing

One thing that really surprised me in this tale, was the sentences many Anons received. The way the headlines read, this was real all-out warfare on governments and corporations a like. But reading the judgements, it appears judges had a different perspective.

Although there were certainly compromises of personal information, the group really wasn’t responsible for a huge amount of theft & fraud. Sure they took down some websites, but whom does that really harm. It makes great headlines, but the bigger systems behind the scenes are actually more secure than that.

”IRC is just the crap out of everyone’s minds…” – Topiary on words thought-typed in IRC chats

After flipping through to the end, it seems we’ve taken a ride through the internet underground, but not through the criminal underworld. That is out there surely, but it’s not run by this scattered team of recluse misfits.



Published at DZone with permission of Sean Hull, author and DZone MVB. (source)

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