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I am the founder and CEO of Data Geekery GmbH, located in Zurich, Switzerland. With our company, we have been selling database products and services around Java and SQL since 2013. Ever since my Master's studies at EPFL in 2006, I have been fascinated by the interaction of Java and SQL. Most of this experience I have obtained in the Swiss E-Banking field through various variants (JDBC, Hibernate, mostly with Oracle). I am happy to share this knowledge at various conferences, JUGs, in-house presentations and on our blog. Lukas is a DZone MVB and is not an employee of DZone and has posted 222 posts at DZone. You can read more from them at their website. View Full User Profile

High Complexity and Low Throughput: Reasons for Using an ORM

07.08.2013
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I’ve recently stumbled upon an interesting blog post about when to use an ORM. I found it to be well-written and quite objective, specifically with respect to its model complexity and throughput diagram:

//mikehadlow.blogspot.ca/2012/06/when-should-i-use-orm.html

Original image taken from this blog post: http://mikehadlow.blogspot.ca/2012/06/when-should-i-use-orm.html

The ORM or not ORM topic will probably never stop showing up on blogs. Some of them are more black and white, such as Jeff Atwood’s Object-Relational Mapping is the Vietnam of Computer Science others are more “50 shades of data access”, such as Martin Fowler’s ORM Hate.

I’m personally impressed by the work ORMs have done for us in times when repetitive SQL started to get boring and CRUD was not yet established. But ORMs do have their caveats as they are indeed leaky abstractions.

The aforementioned article shows in what situations ORMs can pull their weight, and in what situations you better keep operating on a SQL level, using tools like jOOQMyBatisApache DbUtils, or just simply JDBC.

Read the original blog post here:
http://mikehadlow.blogspot.ca/2012/06/when-should-i-use-orm.html

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Published at DZone with permission of Lukas Eder, author and DZone MVB. (source)

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