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Generic Exceptions in Java

01.07.2013
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Wow, I can’t believe it’s been 6 weeks since I last blogged. I still need to write up a review on Plumbr, after seeing it in action at Devoxx, but to ease me back into the writing game, here’s a small(-ish) but useful spot of Java.

It’s always nice to borrow and steal concepts and ideas from other languages. Scala’s Option is one idea I really like, so I wrote an implementation in Java. It wraps an object which may or may not be null, and provides some methods to work with in a more kinda-sorta functional way. For example, the isDefined method adds an object-oriented way of checking if a value is null. It is then used in other places, such as the getOrElse method, which basically says “give me what you’re wrapping, or a fallback if it’s null”.

public T getOrElse(T fallback)
{
    return isDefined() ? get() : fallback;
}

In practice, this would replace tradional Java, such as

public void foo()
{
    String s = dao.getValue();
    if (s == null)
    {
        s = "bar";
    }
    System.out.println(s);
}

with the more concise and OO

public void foo()
{
    Option<String> s = dao.getValue();
    System.out.println(s.getOrElse("bar"));
}

However, what if I want to do something other than get a fallback value – say, throw an exception? More to the point, what if I want to throw a specific type of exception that is both specific in use and not hard-coded into Option? This requires a spot of cunning, and a splash of type inference.

Because this is Java, we can start with a new factory – ExceptionFactory. This is a basic implementation that only creates exceptions constructed with a message, but you can of course expand the code as required.

public interface ExceptionFactory<E extends Exception>
{
    E create(String message);
}

Notice the <E extends Exception> – this is the key to how this works. Using the factory, we can now add a new method to Option:

public <E extends Exception> T getOrThrow(ExceptionFactory<E> exceptionFactory,
                                          String message) throws E
{
    if (isDefined())
    {
        return get();
    }
    else
    {
        throw exceptionFactory.create(message);
    }
}

Again, notice the throws E – this is inferred from the exception factory.

And that, believe it or not, is 90% of what it takes. The one irritation is the need to have exception factories. If you can stomach this, you’re all set. Let’s define a couple of custom exceptions to see this in action.

public class ExceptionA extends Exception
{
    public ExceptionA(String message)
    {
        super(message);
    }

    public static ExceptionFactory<ExceptionA> factory()
    {
        return new ExceptionFactory<ExceptionA>()
        {
            @Override
            public ExceptionA create(String message)
            {
                return new ExceptionA(message);
            }
        };
    }
}

And the suspiciously similar ExceptionB

public class ExceptionB extends Exception
{
    public ExceptionB(String message)
    {
        super(message);
    }

    public static ExceptionFactory<ExceptionB> factory()
    {
        return new ExceptionFactory<ExceptionB>()
        {
            @Override
            public ExceptionB create(String message)
            {
                return new ExceptionB(message);
            }
        };
    }
}

And finally, throw it all together:

public class GenericExceptionTest
{
    @Test(expected = ExceptionA.class)
    public void exceptionA_throw() throws ExceptionA
    {
        Option.option(null).getOrThrow(ExceptionA.factory(),
                                       "Some message pertinent to the situation");
    }

    @Test
    public void exceptionA_noThrow() throws ExceptionA
    {
        String s = Option.option("foo").getOrThrow(ExceptionA.factory(),
                                                   "Some message pertinent to the situation");
        Assert.assertEquals("foo",
                            s);
    }

    @Test(expected = ExceptionB.class)
    public void exceptionB_throw() throws ExceptionB
    {
        Option.option(null).getOrThrow(ExceptionB.factory(),
                                       "Some message pertinent to the situation");
    }

    @Test
    public void exceptionB_noThrow() throws ExceptionB
    {
        String s = Option.option("foo").getOrThrow(ExceptionB.factory(),
                                                   "Some message pertinent to the situation");
        Assert.assertEquals("foo",
                            s);
    }
}

The important thing to notice, as highlighted in bold above, is the exception declared in the method signature is specific – it’s not a common ancestor (Exception or Throwable). This means you can now use Options in your DAO layer, your service layer, wherever, and throw specific exceptions where and how you need.

Download source: You can get the source code and tests from here – genex

Sidenote
One other interesting thing that came out of writing this was the observation that it’s possible to do this:

public void foo()
{
    throw null;
}

public void bar()
{
    try
    {
        foo();
    }
    catch (NullPointerException e)
    {
        ...
    }
}

It goes without saying that this is not a good idea :)

Published at DZone with permission of Steve Chaloner, author and DZone MVB. (source)

(Note: Opinions expressed in this article and its replies are the opinions of their respective authors and not those of DZone, Inc.)

Comments

Matúš Ferko replied on Tue, 2013/05/14 - 9:24am

Main purpose of the Option class is only to avoid null check in Java?

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