David Green is a developer and aspiring software craftsman. He has been programming for 20 years but only getting paid to do it for the last 10; in that time he has worked for a variety of companies from small start-ups to global enterprises. David co-founded the London Software Craftsmanship Community (http://www.londonswcraft.com/) - a group of professional programmers who meet regularly to exchange ideas and improve their craft. David is a DZone MVB and is not an employee of DZone and has posted 24 posts at DZone. You can read more from them at their website. View Full User Profile

Fast Feedback

10.08.2012
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Writing good software is all about getting feedback, quickly. Does it compile? Does it function? Does it build? Does it deploy? Does it do what the customer wanted? Does it actually work? Every step of the way we have feedback loops, to improve the software. The faster these feedback loops are, the faster the software improves.

Builds

Don’t you hate waiting for your code to compile? Or, if you use a language from this century: do you remember back in the olden days when you had to wait for the compiler? Until recently, I’d actually forgotten that incremental compilers are a relatively new invention. I remember when JBuilder (my IDE of choice back in those distant times) first introduced me to incremental compilation – it was something of a revelation! You mean, I don’t have to hit compile? It just does it? In the background? Like magic?!

A few years ago I joined a company who had something of a byzantine build process. As was the fashion at the time, they used ant for their build. Unfortunately, nobody had told them that Eclipse could also compile code. So all code was built with ant. Made a change? Run the ant build to build the relevant library (may require guesswork). Copy it (by hand) to the app server. Quickly restart WebSphere (note: not quick). Test. Lather. Rinse. Repeat. Die of boredom.

Eventually, I replaced this with an Eclipse workspace that could run the application. No more build step. No more copying things by hand. No more mistakes. No more long delays in getting feedback.

Just recently I started working with C++ again after nearly a decade in byte code / interpreted languages. I’d actually forgotten what it was like to wait for code to compile. I’d got so used to working in Eclipse where you press Go and Things Happen(tm). Now instead I have to wait for a build before I can do anything. Every little change involves minutes of my life waiting for Visual Studio.

Then, if I’m really lucky – it will even compile! Remember when your IDE didn’t give you little red squiggles or highlight broken code? How fast is that feedback loop now? Before I’ve even finished typing the IDE is telling me I’m a moron and suggesting how to fix it. Assuming my code compiles, next I run the gauntlet of linking. Normally that means some godawful error message that googling just gives decade old answers and stack overflow posts that might as well be discussing religion.

TDD

I suspect this is why TDD is less common in the C++ world. Not only does the language feel ill-suited to doing TDD (to be honest, it feels ill-suited to writing software at all), but if you have to wait minutes after each change – TDD just doesn’t work.

  • Write a failing test
  • Wait minutes for the compiler to check your work, maybe go for a cuppa
  • Write code to make the test pass
  • Wait minutes for the compiler to check your work, perhaps its lunchtime?
  • Refactor

Actually, scrap the last step – since C++ is basically entirely devoid of automated refactoring tools – just leave whatever mess you’ve created because it’s about as good as it will get.

But with a red, green, refactor cycle that takes approximately 2.6 hours – it would be impossibly slow. No wonder TDD happens less.

Pairing

I’ve been arguing recently about whether pairing or code review is the best way to improve code quality. I always used to be a huge believer in code review – I’d seen it have a massive impact on code quality and really help the team learn both the code and how to code better.

But now, after spending months pairing day in day out – I think pairing is better in every conceivable way than code review. Why? Because it’s so much more immediate. How many times have you heard feedback from code review getting left because “we don’t have time right now” or “we’ll come back to that just as soon as we’ve got this release out”.

But with pairing, you have your reviewer right there offering feedback, before you’ve even finished writing the line of code. Just like your modern IDE – giving you feedback before you’ve even had chance to get it wrong. And, just like the IDE, if the smart ass sitting next to you thinks he knows better, pass over the keyboard and let him show you.

This is just impossible with code review. The feedback cycle is necessarily much slower and, worse, it’s too easy to ignore. You can add a story to the backlog to fix code review comments. You can’t so easily add a story to the backlog to make the argumentative bloke next to you shut up! (More’s the pity, sometimes)

But either way – whether you get feedback from code review or pairing, the important thing is to get feedback. If you’re not getting feedback: you’re not learning and neither you nor your code are improving.

Published at DZone with permission of David Green, author and DZone MVB. (source)

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