I live in the sometimes sunny Brighton (it's in the south of the UK, for those across the pond). The south coast is definitely my favourite place to be, but I spent some time on the outskirts of London whilst at University. I'm starting to focus on my own company Left Logic. It's a web development company with strong focus in usability, accessibility, clean design and powerful bespoke applications. Remy is a DZone MVB and is not an employee of DZone and has posted 50 posts at DZone. You can read more from them at their website. View Full User Profile

Contributing to the Web Community

12.19.2012
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Comments like these make me want to never contribute to this community.

via @adamyeates on Twitter

There was an article that upset a few (or one in particular) designer/UX/foo evangelists. I’m not pointing out this particular instance of pissing battles because if you’ve been on the web and following activity in the front end web community you’ve probably seen your fair share of pissing battles already.

And it’s not Adam in particular that I’m pointing out, but his sentiment (I’ve posted this with Adam’s permission first – I didn’t want to make it like I’m singling him out).

Adam, to me, is an excellent example of the newest generation of Web Worker. It’s possible you, ‘you’ reading this article, are also in that early stage in your career. Or you want become more involved like I did a few years back. Which is why this particular tweet has forced my fingertips to my keyboard to blog about this.

I’ve met my fair share of people who want to blog/get involved/speak (more or at all) but tell me that they don’t feel like they have anything to share. Or that there are smarter people out there – what could they possibly contribute. But Adam’s tweet is the last thing you want to see. What about all those people who think the same thing but don’t say it?

What I’d like to say to those of you thinking about contributing something-anything: do it. Blindly if needs be.

To me there’s two main types of blog posts: technical and opinion. Either one of these are good for you to start with. You’ve got opinions, right? You’ve solved a problem (either design based or with codey stuff).

You are unique. Your perspective is unique. Your solutions are unique.

Most bloggers I know – and certainly me included – started blogging because their memory is pretty useless. Google + blogging served as a search engine for their memory. Start there if you’re still not convinced.

If you share those, you will have helped someone, somewhere, sometime along their way. And the more of that we have, the better (even though it’s possible some content gets stale after a while).

As my friend Chris put it:

Most blog posts are crap, but even if a handful of people find them useful it’s worth it, no?

Hell. yes.

Published at DZone with permission of Remy Sharp, author and DZone MVB. (source)

(Note: Opinions expressed in this article and its replies are the opinions of their respective authors and not those of DZone, Inc.)