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The Best of the Week (Aug 14): DevOps Zone

08.24.2014
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Make sure you didn't miss anything with this list of the Best of the Week in the DevOps Zone (August 14 to August 21). Here they are, in order of popularity:

1. Java 9 Features Announced — What Do You Think?

JDK 9 features have been announced, and we want to know what you think about them! Are these features something you've been waiting for, or are you a bit underwhelmed? Do some of these proposals seem to go against improvements that you want? Post a comment and tell us!

2. Lambda Behave (Java Testing Framework) 0.3 Released

Its great to see that despite only releasing a couple of months ago there's already quite a few people trying out or contributing to lambda behave. Massive thanks to the London Software Craftsmanship Community for hosting a talk on Lambda Behave and the London Java Community and Opencredo for hosting a hackday.

3. When is your code DRY enough?

When facing some duplicate code, you're not always feeling comfortable to dry it up. You're not even sure you'll keep - as is - the code you've just wrote. By experience, you don't want to spend a whole day to end, maybe, with an abstract solution end to reason about.

4. BDD, Automated Acceptance Tests and Continuous Delivery: Dealing with Scenarios that are "Work-in-Progress"

One of the principle rules of Continuous Delivery is that you should never knowingly commit code that will break the build. When you practice test-driven development this is easy: you write a failing test (or, more precisely, a failing "executable specification"), make it pass, and then refactor as required.

5. DevOps Has IT Heroes Sleeping Through the Night

Fifteen years ago, at the height of the dot com bubble, system administrators were burning the candle at both ends. With no cloud, Agile, or DevOps to help them, they were making it happen through sheer force of will and effort. As far as modern IT is concerned, those days are gone, and it's for the best.