Chas Emerick is the founder of Snowtide, a small software company specializing in document content extraction service sand libraries for Java and .NET, and a co-author of the forthcoming "Clojure Programming" book from O'Reilly Chas is a DZone MVB and is not an employee of DZone and has posted 17 posts at DZone. You can read more from them at their website. View Full User Profile

2012 State of Clojure Survey

07.19.2012
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I’ve run “State of Clojure” surveys for each of the last two years (see results from 2010 and 2011), and the time has come for the 2012 edition.

The survey itself is embedded below.  It will remain open for input for approximately a week, until ~Thursday, July 26th.

A lot has happened over the past year: the first non-Conj Clojure conference went off to great popular acclaim, Clojure 1.4.0 was released, more Clojure books have been published, and more and more people continue to be drawn into the language’s orbit.  The apparent vector of progress and activity seems to be approximately the same as it was when I wrote up the first State of Clojure survey:

The Clojure community is larger than it ever has been, and shows no sign of slackening its growth.  It seems like now would be a good time to take stock of where the community is, how people came to use Clojure, and how it’s being used in the world.

Hopefully enough responses will come through that we’ll be able to get a good picture of the current state of affairs, and maybe a little insight into where Clojure can and should make headway in the future.

As before, I will post again sometime shortly after the survey closes with all of the captured data, some pretty charts, and whatever attempts at witty, (un?)biased commentary I can come up with.  ;-) It would be great to see some follow-on analyses using the raw data: e.g., people doing game development are really unhappy with the state of libraries in their chosen domain; or, maybe people doing mobile development are starting to seriously look at some particular Clojure implementation. Who knows what interesting tidbits might rise to the surface if someone really dug into the data…

Finally, please do what you can to spread around this survey to those that you know of that are working with Clojure — really, in any capacity.  You’ll find various social media chicklets at the bottom of this post if you want the lazy way out.

With that, on to the survey itself

The State of Clojure, 2012

 

It would be interesting to have some data on how Clojure is being used and what path people have taken to come to use it. All questions are optional. The survey will close on July 26th, 2011; all data will be shared with the community @ cemerick.com shortly thereafter. If you're somehow viewing this directly, go to http://cemerick.com/2012/07/19/2012-state-of-clojure-survey/ for information on what this is.






Clojure (the JVM original)
Clojure.CLR (.NET / Mono)
ClojureScript (JavaScript)
clojure-py (Python)
clojure-scheme (Gambit Scheme / C)
clojurec (C)



They implement core functionality well.
They are more effective than analogous libraries in other languages.
They are easy to find.
Their maintainers are receptive to feedback, patches, etc.
They are accurately and adequately documented.








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