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I am an experienced software development manager, project manager and CTO focused on hard problems in software development and maintenance, software quality and security. For the last 15 years I have been managing teams building electronic trading platforms for stock exchanges and investment banks around the world. My special interest is how small teams can be most effective at building real software: high-quality, secure systems at the extreme limits of reliability, performance, and adaptability. Jim is a DZone MVB and is not an employee of DZone and has posted 102 posts at DZone. You can read more from them at their website. View Full User Profile

10 Ways to Make Your App More Secure: #7 Logging and Intrusion Detection

07.03.2014
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This is part 7 of a series of posts on the OWASP Top 10 Proactive Development Controls: 10 things you can do as a developer to make your app secure.

Logging and Intrusion Detection

Logging is a straightforward part of any system. But logging is important for more than troubleshooting and debugging. It is also critical for activity auditing, intrusion detection (telling ops when the system is being hacked) and forensics (figuring out what happened after the system was hacked). You should take all of this into account in your logging strategy.

What to log, what to log… and what not to log

Make sure that you are always logging when, who, where and what: timestamps (you will need to take care of syncing timestamps across systems and devices or be prepared to account for differences in time zones, accuracy and resolution), user id, source IP and other address information, and event details.

To make correlation and analysis easier, follow a common logging approach throughout the application and across systems where possible. Use an extensible logging framework like SLF4J with Logback or Apache Log4j/Log4j2.

Compliance regulations like PCI DSS may dictate what information you need to record and when and how, who gets access to the logs, and how long you need to keep this information. You may also need to prove that audit logs and other security logs are complete and have not been tampered with (using a HMAC for example), and ensure that these logs are always archived. For these reasons, it may be better to separate out operations and debugging logs from transaction audit trails and security event logs.

There is data that you must log (complete sequential history of specific events to meet compliance or legal requirements). Data that you must not log (PII or credit card data or opt-out/do-not-track data or intercepted communications). And other data you should not log (authentication information and other personal data).

And watch out for Log Forging attacks where bad guys inject delimiters like extra CRLF sequences into text fields which they know will be logged in order to try to cover their tracks, or inject Javascript into data which will trigger an XSS attack when the log entry is displayed in a browser-based log viewer. Like other injection attacks, protect the system by encoding user data before writing it to the log.

Review code for correct logging practices and test the logging code to make sure that it works. OWASP’s Logging Cheat Sheet provides more guidelines on how to do logging right, and what to watch out for.

AppSensor – Intrusion Detection

Another OWASP project, the OWASP AppSensor explains how to build on application logging to implement application-level intrusion detection. AppSensor outlines common detection points in an application, places that you should add checks to alert you that your system is being attacked. For example, if a server-side edit catches bad data that should already have been edited at the client, or catches a change to a non-editable field, then you either have some kind of coding bug or (more likely) somebody has bypassed client-side validation and is attacking your app. Don’t just log this case and return an error: throw an alert or take some kind of action to protect the system from being attacked like disconnecting the session.

You could also check for known attack signatures:.Nick Galbreath (formerly at Etsy and now at startup Signal Sciences) has done some innovative work on detecting SQL injection and HTML injection attacks by mining logs to find common fingerprints and feeding this back into filters to detect when attacks are in progress and potentially block them.

In the next 3 posts, we’ll step back from specific problems, and look at the larger issues of secure architecture, design and requirements.

Published at DZone with permission of Jim Bird, author and DZone MVB. (source)

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